Searching for David Truslove - 11 results.

1. Preces and Responses For ATBB Voices
David Truslove

Duration: 2'30"
Ensemble: ATBB unaccompanied
Grading: Medium
View score Order form

Written specifically for the layclerks of Winchester Cathedral Choir, these responses offer to the newcomer some arresting harmonies and a few irregular chordal progressions, as well as the unconventional use of an alto soloist. Care might be needed over the tuning and balancing of some chords but otherwise the responses can be performed without difficulty, as can the conventional cantor's part.


2. O Salutaris Hostia
David Truslove

Duration: 2'20"
Ensemble: SATB unaccompanied
Grading: Medium
View score Order form

This setting of O Salutaris Hostia, written for Paul Brough and the choir of All Saints, Margaret Street, is by turns reflective and urgent. Its rich harmonies should present few difficulties for a competent choir which can briefly divide into eight parts.

O Salutaris Hostia is a two-verse fragment of the hymn Verbum Supernum Prodiens, written by St Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century for use in the Roman Catholic divine office of Lauds, where it is appointed for use on the feast of Corpus Christi. In English-speaking countries, it is also sung during Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, at the point when the host is taken from the tabernacle.


3. Sweet was the song
David Truslove

Duration: 2'00"
Ensemble: SATB unaccompanied
Grading: Easy/Medium
View score Order form

Sweet was the song was written for Romsey Choral Society and first performed by them in Romsey Abbey in December 2011. Mostly in four parts, this gentle and appealing carol is within the reach of all choirs.


4. There Is No Rose
David Truslove

Duration: 3'00"
Ensemble: SATB semichorus unaccompanied
Grading: Medium
View score Order form

This setting of There is no rose is for unaccompanied choir with soloists or semi-chorus. The separate choral groups initially overlap but combine near the end for a climatic concluding statement.


5. There Is No Rose
David Truslove

Duration: 3'00"
Ensemble: SSA unaccompanied
Grading: Easy/Medium
View score Order form

Although conceived originally for just three solo voices, There is no rose can also be performed by an ensemble of female or boys' voices. Care might be needed over intonation and the triplet rhythms, but the dynamics can be adjusted to suit the forces available.

Please note this is an SSA setting. For a setting by the same composer for SATB and semichorus, please click here.


6. Breathe on me, Breath of God
David Truslove

Duration: 2'20"
Ensemble: SATB soprano or semichorus piano or organ
Grading: Easy
View score Order form

Breath on me, Breath of God is a simple four-part setting of the well-known hymn text by Edwin Hatch, with the third verse devised as a canon between upper and lower voices. The anthem can be performed with either organ or piano accompaniment, and the descant part in verse four can be sung by a soprano soloist, a semichorus or children's voices.


7. Tomorrow shall be my dancing day
David Truslove

Duration: 2'00"
Ensemble: children's choir organ piano
Grading: Easy/Medium
View score Order form

Tomorrow shall be my dancing day is a highly approachable and entirely new setting of the traditional Christmas text written for soprano/treble voices and organ (or piano). Upper and lower voices are used in the refrain and a descant is added to the third verse, which reaches an exciting conclusion in the final bars.


8. O Saviour of the world
David Truslove

Duration: 2'15"
Ensemble: SATB unaccompanied
Grading: Easy/Medium
View score Order form

This is a relatively simple unaccompanied setting of the familiar English text which deliberately keeps to just four parts. Although there are some chordal progressions which might need careful tuning and balancing, this short work, which could serve either as an introit or an anthem, is well within the reach of a competent parish choir or a cathedral choir wanting something different with very limited rehearsal time.


9. Suo Gân
arr. David Truslove

Duration: 4'00"
Ensemble: children's choir piano
Grading: Easy
View score Order form

This traditional and newly-translated Welsh lullaby is arranged for piano and three-part upper voices with an optional solo near the end of the third verse. Care might be needed for the projection of the piano part's inner phrases, but otherwise, this is a straightforward setting well within the capabilities of both young and adult singers.


10. Responses for Men's Voices
Tamsin Jones, Edmund Saddington, David Truslove

Duration: 8'30"
Ensemble: ATB divisi unaccompanied
Grading: Medium
View score Order form

Appearing for the first time in a single volume, the settings of the Preces and Responses for men's voices (ATB with various divisions) by Tamsin Jones, Edmund Saddington and David Truslove all appear in this collection. Each setting is closely associated with a particular cathedral.

Tamsin Jones's Preces and Responses for Low Voices was first performed at Chester Cathedral. Its Lord's Prayer setting is a three-part canon with the tenor inverted.

Edmund Saddington's Preces & Responses, which have never been published before, were written in 2012 and given their premiere by the lay clerks and choral scholars at Portsmouth Cathedral under Dr David Price in March 2015.

David Truslove's Preces & Responses for ATBB Voices was written for the layclerks of Winchester Cathedral Choir, though they're also in the repertoire at Chichester Cathedral. They offer some arresting harmonies and a few irregular progressions, as well as the unconventional use of an alto soloist.


11. Tantum Ergo
David Truslove

Duration: 2'30"
Ensemble: SSATB unaccompanied
Grading: Medium
View score Order form

My setting of Tantum ergo was written to complement my setting of O Salutaris for performances at Benediction. It can of course also be performed at communion services. While both pieces share the same key (D major), Tantum ergo is based on a changing metrical pattern with 5/4 used in alternate bars. To the four vocal parts in verse 1 an additional soprano line is added – in the manner of a descant. Its devotional character and uncomplicated idiom should appeal to choirs of most abilities.