Searching for Tim Attride - 10 results.

1. Five Collects
Tim Attride

Duration: 5'00"
Ensemble: Unaccompanied SAB SAMen
Grading: Easy/Medium
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These five collects were inspired, in the first instance, by a setting which my late father wrote about forty years ago. After reading the words at his funeral, but being unable to find the music, I started composing the Trinity 21 from scratch. With just three men in the church choir at the time, it seemed logical to write in SAMen format.

Once the first one was finished, the rest flowed reasonably quickly and the two Epiphany collects received a concert premier by a local chamber choir the day before the first one was used liturgically. As with much of my writing, time signatures may vary during the pieces, but a sense of carrying the words is maintained throughout.


2. Songs from Flanders Fields
Tim Attride

Duration: 4'00"
Ensemble: SAMen unaccompanied
Grading: Easy/Medium
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Using the words of two poems written during WW1 - one very well known, the other deserving to be - these two short anthems are most suitable for Remembrance Sunday or Armistice Day services, either individually or, as the product subtitle suggests, as a calling (by the soldiers who perished) and response (by us to their sacrifices).

Lt Col. John McCrae wrote his words whilst serving as a military doctor in the Canadian Field Artillery at Ypres, probably in May 1915 in response to the death of his fellow soldier and friend Lt Alexis Helmer. It was published posthumously in 1918, McCrae having died of pneumonia in January that year.

Moina Michael, an American with family roots going back to the Huguenots in Flanders, was a humanitarian and poet who was so inspired by McCrae's words that she both wrote this response and started the tradition of selling poppies to support injured war veterans. Indeed, she vowed to wear a poppy herself every day of her life.

The anthems have been written specifically to support the poetry, which is why there are bars of so many varying lengths. Despite (or, more probably, because of) this, there is a rhythm which will soon feel very natural when they are sung. They could fit well before and after either a period of silence or reflection, or a time of appropriate prayer.


3. O quam gloriosum
Tim Attride

Duration: 1'30"
Ensemble: SAMen unaccompanied
Grading: Easy
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Although there are a number of established settings of these words, almost all are in four or more parts. Though in SAMen format, there is still enough contrapuntal content in this version to hold the interest and attention of the listeners (and singers). Suitable for All Saints, patronal festivals or any individual saint's day.


4. Domine Memento Mei
Tim Attride

Duration: 2'30"
Ensemble: SAMen unaccompanied
Grading:
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A setting for SAMen of the second of Christ's Seven Last Words (and the malefactor's prior request) using the Latin text of Luke 23: 42-43 in both an optional plainchant and a polyphonic setting. Perfectly suited to Good Friday services or devotions, this will be easily picked up by most choirs as, although there are moments requiring careful intonation, there are no really difficult passages.


5. Creator of the starry height
Tim Attride

Duration: 2'30"
Ensemble: SAMen
Grading: Easy
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Using four verses of one of the many translations of Conditor alme siderum, as well as the original plainchant melody, this accompanied version is for SAMen. With verses intended to be split between the voices to add interest, this includes two unison verses, an SA verse and unison plus descant for the final verse before the climactic amen. However, if forces are even more limited, it can be sung in unison throughout.


6. Ecce mysterium
Tim Attride

Duration: 2'30"
Ensemble: SATB unaccompanied
Grading: Easy
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Using the Latin words of the very familiar verse in 1 Corinthians ("Behold, I tell you a mystery¬Ö"), this short very reflective SATB anthem is suitable for funerals, memorial services, All Souls and even Easter Eve. The biggest stretch in any part is a few middle Ds for the basses, but they do have an optional bottom D to end. Other than that, very accessible. Not technically concordant throughout, but it definitely does not sound discordant. Recording is with thanks to the Thanet Chamber Choir.


7. Confitebor tibi, Domine
Tim Attride

Duration: 1'30"
Ensemble: SAMen unaccompanied
Grading: Easy
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A short unaccompanied SAMen setting of a psalm verse. Here we have Psalm 9 v1 (I will give thanks to you, Lord, with all my heart; I will tell of all your wonderful deeds). Suitable as an introit, communion motet or benediction at times of thanksgiving or when the psalm is chosen in the liturgy.


8. Miserere mei, Domine
Tim Attride

Duration: 1'30"
Ensemble: SAMen unaccompanied
Grading: Easy
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A short SAMen setting of two verses from Psalm 6 (Have mercy on me, Lord, for I am faint; heal me, Lord, for my bones are in agony. The Lord has heard my cry for mercy; the Lord accepts my prayer.) Well within the vocal ranges, with very little to trouble the reasonably competent choir beyond some chromaticism. Suitable as an introit or during Communion either when Psalm 6 is in the liturgy or, based on its penitential content, during Lent.


9. In pace in idipsum
Tim Attride

Duration: 1'45"
Ensemble: SAMen unaccompanied
Grading: Easy
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A short setting of a Latin psalm verse, this time, Psalm 4, verse 8. "I will both lay me down in peace, and sleep: for thou, Lord, only makest me dwell in safety." For SAMen and well within the relevant voice range. Suitable for when the psalm is part of the liturgy or as an evening introit or benediction.


10. Domine, Dominus noster
Tim Attride

Duration: 1'45"
Ensemble: SAMen unaccompanied
Grading: Easy
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Part of the series of SAMen settings of Latin psalm verses: the first verse of Psalm 8 (O Lord, our Governor, how excellent is thy name in all the world). Suitable for the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus (variously either the 1st, 2nd or 3rd of January) or as an introit or communion anthem when the psalm is set liturgically.