Composers & Artists

Neil Sands

Neil Sands

Neil Sands, a professional music typesetter, founded the Chichester Music Press in 2003. He studied Composition at London's Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and subsequently at the University of Wales in Bangor.

Neil currently sings with Chichester's Chantry Quire, and sang for a year with Chichester Cathedral choir as a countertenor. He has also been Musical Director of Bognor Regis Choir, and of Chichester Amateur Operatic Society, mounting Annie Get Your Gun in Chichester's Minerva Theatre.

Previously, Neil was the conductor of the Portsmouth University Choral Union, the University of Wales' Aberystwyth Elizabethan Madrigal Singers, and Aberystwyth's Showtime Singers.

Neil has taught music composition at Chichester's Prebendal School, as well as teaching music theory, composition and piano to private pupils. He's done some programming for Sibelius, and several of his plugins ship with the program. He served as Technical Editor for the Sibelius tutor book Sibelius 7 Music Notation Essentials. He has also worked as an English and Welsh teacher, and as a newsreader for Radio Manhattan in Łódź in Poland.

Home page

 

Tim Attride

Tim Attride

Music has played a large part in my life, particularly after experiencing an epiphany moment hearing the Trumpet Voluntary played by my father for a wedding. My first organist post was at the local Catholic church, supposedly 'just for two or three years' to get the hang of playing for services. Eighteen years later, I transferred from there to become Director of Music at All Saints Church, Birchington, having sung in their choir for evening services for a number of years.

I enjoy writing music, much of which has been performed not only by the church choir and other local choirs, but also on occasions in Canterbury Cathedral, Rochester Cathedral, Hexham Abbey and as far afield as the USA, Nigeria & Canada. This music often attracts positive comments from the congregation. Whether for the choir ('That was a little piece of Heaven' about Ne reminiscaris) or organ ('I just needed that' about one of my hymn meditations), I believe that my music appeals in its tunefulness and ability to set a mood. My first serious attempt at music writing - a new tune and arrangement for Christina Rossetti’s In the Bleak Mid-Winter - won a local competition. I now have over 100 compositions, including a Requiem, a Missa Brevis, a setting of an extract from Caedmon’s 'Dream of the Rood', many short anthems & quite a few hymn descants.

Aside from music, I spent twenty seven years in the civil service before taking early retirement to enjoy family life, walking and bell ringing.

 

Paul Hayward

Paul Hayward

Paul Anthony Hayward was born and raised in Nottingham, where he developed a love for music whilst at school. He has held cathedral organ and choral scholarships and read music at the University of Wales, Bangor. He also holds diplomas from the Royal College of Organists, London College of Music and Trinity College, London.

He was appointed as assistant director of music and director of the cathedral youth choir at St Barnabas Roman Catholic Cathedral, Nottingham before becoming the inaugural holder of the joint assistant organist post between Brecon Cathedral and Christ College, Brecon. Paul has played for a number of high profile engagements, including royal visits, CD recordings, BBC broadcasts and choir tours.

Paul is an experienced choral director, and regularly works with choirs around the East Midlands. He enjoys an active recital and teaching calendar as a harpsichordist and organist, as well as being a respect composer and arranger. Further information can be found at www.paulhayward.org.uk.

 

Gareth Hemmings

After reading Music at Cambridge University, studying with Robin Holloway, Hugh Wood and Alexander Goehr, Gareth went into a teaching career, spending time as Assistant Director of Music at both Caterham and Kingston Grammar School. Following 12 years as Director of Music at Old Palace of John Whitgift School he is now Director of Music at The Portsmouth Grammar School.

Composition and arranging work has largely focused on music for school choirs, orchestras and jazz groups. As a choral director Gareth has coached children's choruses for productions with English National Opera, Garsington Opera, Glyndebourne Touring Opera and the Royal Opera House.

In addition to teaching and composing Gareth enjoys playing and gigging as a jazz pianist.

 

Justin Breame

Justin Breame

Justin Breame lives and works as a composer and teacher in the UK. His concert works range from solo guitar to choral and orchestral. His work also includes pieces for fixed media and short film and documentary scoring. He has been successful in calls for scores for Vox Novus (NY) and the Music Makers of London choral competition. His string quartet The Dark Entry was a winner in a call for scores by the Grammy Award-winning contemporary ensemble Orchestra of Our Time, based in New York. His works have been performed in the UK, USA, Canada and Europe.

 

Edmund Saddington

Bass-baritone Edmund Saddington began his musical career as a chorister in the cathedral choir of Southwell Minster, Nottinghamshire and as a gap-year choral scholar in the choir of Portsmouth Cathedral before embarking on undergraduate study at London's Trinity College of Music.

An experienced soloist and consort singer, he records and performs regularly with many of the UK and Europe's finest vocal ensembles, including The Monteverdi Choir, Gabrieli Consort, BBC Singers, Academy of Ancient Music, Eric Whitacre Singers, Stile Antico, John Rutter's Cambridge Singers, The Marian Consort and Collegium Vocale Gent. For the last five years Edmund was a lay clerk in the choir of Winchester Cathedral; he is now a permanent member of the choir of HM Chapels Royal, Tower of London.

Edmund studies singing with Brindley Sherratt and Gary Coward; he composes when time allows.

 

Nathan Waring

Nathan Waring

Nathan is a freelance choral composer, conductor and accompanist. He has worked alongside composers such as Ruth Gipps, Norman Kay, Peter Aston, Will Todd and Patrick Hawes in performing new choral repertoire, and has conducted the English Chamber Orchestra, Norfolk Symphony Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra Anglia for a variety of concert engagements.

As a pianist, he regularly works with singers from The Monteverdi Choir, English National Opera and Glyndebourne, as well as supporting the work of the John Lewis Partnership Music Society across the UK.

Nathan's music has been performed in a wide variety of diverse locations, including the Royal Festival Hall, the Edinburgh Fringe, and cathedrals and concert halls across Europe.

 

Matthew Nash

Matthew Nash

Matthew studied music at the University of Bristol where he majored in performance and composition, and was an assistant tutor to Dr Glyn Jenkins, teaching harmony to undergraduates. Whilst at the University, Matthew received piano tuition from international concert pianist Raymond Clarke, and has performed at The Barbican, London. Matthew graduated from the University with two music degrees - BA, Hons (First Class) and MA (Distinction).

Matthew is also an accompanist, having accompanied for Llanharan RFC Songsters, Cowbridge Male Voice Choir, Bristol Cabot Choir and the University of Bristol Choral Society. Matthew has also accompanied for Nigel Perrin (The King's Singers).

Matthew also writes music — his compositions and arrangements have been performed in various venues across the UK. Significant compositions include a commission for piano, violin and clarinet trio for the professional ensemble Gemini, and two large scale works for orchestra and chorus.

Matthew directed the University of Bristol Chamber Choir in his final year at University, with whom he took the baton in a performance of Haydn's Heiligmesse, with orchestra, at St George's, Brandon Hill, Bristol. He is also joint Honorary Musical Director of the Bristol based choir Unity Singers, and has musically directed Red, Hot and Cole and Mack & Mabel at the Redgrave Theatre, Bristol.

Matthew currently teaches piano at home, and at St Clare's, Porthcawl, and is the Musical Director for Llantrisant Male Choir, and Bridgend Tabernacle Choir. You can follow Matthew on Twitter @AceMusicUK, and on Facebook/acemusicuk. For more information, please visit www.matthewbnash.co.uk.

 

David Barton

David Barton

David was born in Winchester in 1983, and has been at the helm of award-winning David Barton Music since 2001. He combines a busy portfolio of teaching, accompanying and composing both from his base in Lichfield, and across the UK.

David has over 100 compositions and arrangements published in the UK, USA and Canada, and thousands of copies of his music have been sold worldwide. These include works for solo voice, choir, organ, woodwind, orchestra and chamber ensembles. Regular performances, particularly of choral works, take place especially in the USA.

David writes in a variety of styles, but mainly classical. His music is designed to be tuneful, generally easy on the ear and accessible to a wide range of ensembles, particularly those with limited resources. A number of works have received favourable reviews in Church Music Quarterly, Clarinet &hellips; Saxophone Magazine and Pan Magazine. In 2011, his setting of A Celtic Blessing was selected as one of the prestigious JW Pepper Editor's Choice for that year.

 

Jonathan Millican

Jonathan Millican

Jonathan Millican read music at Lancaster University from 2000-2004 where he gained a masters' degree in Performance and Musicology. Born in Carlisle, he was a chorister under Andrew Seivewright and Jeremy Suter and still sings as bass lay clerk at Carlisle Cathedral. Specialising mainly in choral music, his compositions have been performed regularly in services in Carlisle Cathedral and in local schools and churches.

Jonathan has performed around the country as a soloist, both as a treble and a baritone, including roles in Bach's St John Passion, Samson, Judas Maccabaeus, Messiah and Elijah. Alongside his solo work he has had several directing roles including The Lanercost Festival Chorus, Carlisle Cantate Childrens choir (co-founded with Edward Taylor), Assistant Organist at Carlisle Cathedral, and the Abbey Singers, a choir founded by Andrew Seivewright and previously directed by Jeremy Suter.

As well as his performance and directing roles, Jonathan works at the University of Cumbria as a Senior Lecturer in Singing and Community Liaison, delivering vocal performance workshops and masterclasses to undergraduate students, schools and community projects around the north of England.

 

David Fawcett

David Fawcett

David Fawcett was born in Radcliffe, Lancashire in 1964. A keen singer from his earliest years, when his family moved to Lincolnshire he became Head Chorister and then Organ Scholar at Gainsborough Parish Church. He became an Associate of the Royal College of Organists at 17 then took the Organ Scholarship at Nottingham University, where he read music and took every opportunity to gain experience as a conductor.

Alongside a career in the civil service and the BBC in London, he maintained his music activities principally by conducting the Festival Chorus, a South London choral society, for 26 years. In 2010 he gave up his career altogether to give more time to music, returning to his musical roots in the church by becoming Director of Music at St Mary's, Balham. This post gave him the excuse to take composing more seriously, in order to generate a steady flow of pieces specifically for his own choir. As his technique has developed, so has the range of ambition in his choral works - encompassing the simplest unison to three part anthems, as well as multi-voice motets and carols.

David is a Trustee and Director of the Association of British Choral Directors. During 2014 he is relocating to Swanage in the Isle of Purbeck, where he hopes to complete his transition to becoming a full time choral composer, conductor, organist and music teacher.

 

Alan Smith

Alan Smith

Alan Smith was born in London in 1962. He was Organ Scholar at Kings' College, London, where he studied composition with Nicola LeFanu and David Lumsdaine, and also held a Licentiate Diploma in Composition from Trinity College, London. He was Musical Director of his local parish church, St Andrew's in Burgess Hill. In January 2009, he was appointed Composer-in-Residence to the Burgess Hill Choral Society. Alan left full-time teaching after running a busy music department for 22 years in order to pursue a career as a freelance musician and combined performing, lecturing and examining with his activities as a composer

From his first competition success in 1990, Alan's choral and organ compositions won numerous awards and prizes and his works have featured in both the London Festival of Contemporary Church Music and the 2007 Festival of New Organ Music. More recent successes include the 2012 AGO-ECS Publishing Award for Choral Composition, making him the first British composer to win this prestigious American prize, as well as the 2013 Pallant Prize.

Alan's output is predominantly of choral and vocal music; his work is widely performed throughout Europe and America, and has been broadcast on both BBC Radio 3 and Classic FM. Many of Alan's compositions are written for specific choirs or occasions and later commissions included work for the Burgess Hill Choral Society (Sussex, UK), St James the Greater (Charlestown, WV), the Cantilena Singers (Croydon, UK), Millfield School (Somerset, UK) and a chamber organ piece for Paul Ayres (London, UK). His catalogue runs to nearly 300 pieces, most of which are available from 17 different publishers in the UK and America, or from his website www.cantabile-music.com

Alan died in 2017. He was only 54.

 

Laurence Caldecote

Laurence Caldecote

Born in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire in 1983, Laurence grew up and was educated in Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire. He started to learn the piano aged four, studying with Sue Macer and Zachary Dunbar. Laurence began accompanying church services at St Augustine's RC Parish Church, Hoddesdon five years later and was later appointed Organist from 1995 – 2001.

Laurence has studied composition with Chris Hazell and Robert Ramskill and holds a BA Hons in Music Composition and Professional Practice from Coventry University. In his final year, he was Director of the Coventry University Performing Arts Chamber Choir.

Laurence has studied the organ with Dr Martin Moxham, Geoffrey Holroyde, Tim Campain and Kerry Beaumont. He is currently the Associate Organist at St Nicolas Parish Church, Nuneaton, where he has been since 2002. He holds both ABRSM Piano and Organ at Grade 8 with distinction and and is a Fellow of the Guild of Musicians and Singers (FGMS).

Laurence, an experienced accompanist, has played for performances of Handel's Messiah, Stainer's Crucifixion, Maunder's Olivet to Calvary, Faure's Requiem and, at the Buxton Festival in 2012, Sullivan's Prodigal Son as well as for services in cathedrals around the UK. As a recitalist, Laurence has played many of the cathedrals and parish churches around the UK as well as other venues such as Blenheim Palace near Oxford and the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow.

In his free time enjoys swimming, playing badminton, walks in the countryside and reading about the political and architectural history of Britain. A member of the National Trust, Laurence enjoys visiting the properties and the surrounding areas.

 

Reuben Thomas

Reuben Thomas

Reuben Thomas was a boy chorister, later choral student and finally lay clerk at St John's College, Cambridge, where he also took bachelor's and doctoral degrees in computer science. He is now a lay clerk at Westminster Cathedral in London, a translator and a poet.

 

David Truslove

David Truslove

David Truslove graduated with a degree in music from Cardiff University in 1980, and gained an M.Mus in Musicology in 2012 from Southampton University, where he studied composition briefly with Michael Finnissy. He is a choral specialist, with many years experience as both conductor (Romsey Choral Society from 1991 - 2012) and alto lay-clerk (variously at St Michael's College, Tenbury, Rochester Cathedral and, from 1988, Winchester Cathedral where he sang for nineteen years). As well as composing he also teaches part-time, undertakes freelance proof-reading work and contributes programme notes to music festivals.

 

John Hosking

John Hosking

John Hosking was born in Cornwall in 1976 and studied the organ with Peter Jolley and David Briggs. At the age of 18 he was awarded the Organ Scholarship at the Royal Parish Church of St Martin-in-the-Fields in London, also winning the Robertshaw Exhibition from the Royal College of Organists to study with Martin Baker.

A student at the Royal College of Music from 1995 - 1999, John was appointed the Organ Scholar of Westminster Abbey in 1996 and is the only person to have ever held this post for a period of three years. During this time he accompanied the Abbey Choir on many Royal and State occasions, broadcast on BBC Radio and gave 20 solo recitals in the Abbey. Upon graduating, John acted as Assistant Organist at Lincoln and Truro Cathedrals before being appointed Master of the Choristers at Bramdean School in Exeter.

In much demand as a recitalist and accompanist, John has given concerts in Sweden, Germany, Canada and America and broadcast on BBC 1, BBC 2, S4C, BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4 and worldwide on the Sky News and CNN programmes. He appears on several commercial CDs as soloist and accompanist, and has just recorded his third solo CD for Regent Records at St Asaph Cathedral, due for release at the end of 2012.

John has been Assistant Organist of St Asaph Cathedral since September 2004, in which role he acts as principal accompanist to the Cathedral Choir. He is also Organist of St. Winefride's Roman Catholic Church in St. Asaph, and Accompanist to the St. Asaph Choral Society. Active as a composer, John has recently completed commissions for the St. Asaph Choral Society, Cor Meibion Trelawnyd and the Choir of Bangor Cathedral. His Christmas Carol In a Lowly Stable's Manger was featured by the BBC last Christmas and a large work, The Seven Trumpets for the St Asaph and Colwyn Choral Societies scored for chorus, organ, brass and percussion will be premiered in December 2013.

 

Jamie W. Hall

Jamie W. Hall

Bass baritone Jamie W. Hall is a professional consort singer and concert soloist based in London and the south east. Currently a member of the world-famous BBC Singers, Jamie has made numerous recordings and radio broadcasts and performs regularly in concert venues around London and the UK.

Born in a small mining village in the Nottinghamshire coalfield, Jamie's singing career began when a rather frank appraisal of his keyboard skills lead him to conclude that his career as a concert pianist was going nowhere. Since then he has studied voice, reading music at Liverpool and then moving on to become a lay clerk with the cathedral choirs of Chester and more recently, Winchester.

Jamie's website

 

Wyn Pearson

Wyn Pearson

Wyn Pearson read music at The University of Wales, Bangor, gaining a Bachelor of Music degree in 1993, a Postgraduate Diploma in 1995 and a Master of Music degree, also in 1995. Since then, Wyn has worked as a guitarist and Musical Director extensively throughout the UK, Europe and beyond with numerous artists in a variety of venues. He has been employed as a session musician for radio, television, film and as a studio musician working on many recordings. Wyn continues to appear regularly on S4C (Channel 4 Wales), working on programmes filmed in front of studio audiences, whilst freelancing with other artistes, most notably Katherine Jenkins, Michael Ball and legendary rock producer Alan Parsons.

Wyn is proud to be guitarist with renowned folk singer Siân James, and in 2009, went with her to represent Wales at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington.

Original works have received performances by members of the National Orchestra of Wales and the Society for the Promotion of New Music. He won the Instrumental Ensemble category for Composition at the Welsh National Eisteddfod in 2000 and the coveted Tlws Y Cerddor (composers' medal) at the National Eisteddfod in Flintshire in 2007.

Wyn has recently completed Hybrid Picking, a tuition book and DVD, which is published worldwide by Mel Bay Publications.

Wyn Pearson's website

 

Edward-Rhys Harry

Edward-Rhys Harry

Edward-Rhys Harry comes from the village of Penclawdd, on the North Coast of The Gower Peninsula. As a fourteen year old he was first employed as an organist and also began conducting rehearsals for local Cymanfaoedd Canu (singing festivals). Undergraduate studies in composition and voice at University of Wales Bangor (through the medium of Welsh) were followed with postgraduate study in Music Technology and Sound Recording. Following a successful career lecturing in sixth form colleges where he gained his Qualified Teacher Status and which supported his further study in composition, at the London College of Music, where he studied under Francis Pott and Laurence Roman, he graduated with a Master of Music degree. In 2006 when the National Eisteddfod came to Felindre near Swansea, Edward was proud to be made a member of Gorsedd Y Beirdd.

He left full time teaching after winning a scholarship to study Choral Conducting with Simon Halsey, Adrian Partington and Neil Ferris at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, in Cardiff. During his studies he was the first (and second) recipient of the RWCMD Glynne Jones Conducting Scholarship and graduated with an MA degree. Edward is the first Welshman to receive a recognised qualification in Choral Conducting. He is currently a doctoral student in the field of Choral Training Techniques - at the RWCMD, whilst working as a freelance composer, arranger and conductor.

This season Edward has already completed choral commissions from Llandaff Cathedral Choir and the Arts Council of Wales, as well as a landmark world premiere recording of Joseph Parry's Te Deum, with the London Welsh Chorale. In October he conducted The London Welsh Festival of Massed Male Choirs at the Royal Albert Hall. He will be the vocal coach for a Music Theatre company in Germany this December, will coach the Chorus of the Volgograd Opera House (Russia) in January, will return to Volgograd as the inaugural Artistic Director of Voces Volgograd', a choral festival, in April. In early May he will direct Cor Bro Ogwr in performances of his reconstruction of Joseph Parry's Emmanuel in Pennsylvania, Philadelphia and New York, as well as conducting a Cymanfa Ganu in Lancaster, PA.

Edward directs the London Welsh Male Voice Choir, Reading Festival Chorus, Côr Bro Ogwr (Bridgend) and the London Welsh Chorale, as well as his own choir 'The Harry Ensemble', who perform and promote British (particularly Welsh) choral music abroad. He is Associate Conductor of the British Sinfonietta. He remains in demand as a workshop leader and choral clinician across the UK.

For further information please visit www.edwardrhysharry.com or www.harryensemble.com.

 

William Morris

William Morris

William Morris is a composer, educator, musical director and performer. With a BA from Bristol University in Music, followed by an MA in Composition for Film and Television with Distinction from Kingston University, William combines a classical background with a modern creative approach. Published by Chichester Music Press, a member of PRS, MCPS, BASCA and a Professional Writing Associate of Mercury Musical Developments, William receives commissions across varied media from film, to theatre and the concert platform. His specialist fields are in such diverse areas from traditional choral works and pastiche composition to contemporary film scoring and sequencing techniques. His compositions have been performed in such prestigious venues as Hampton Court Palace, St Paul's Cathedral, G-Live Guildford, The Queen's Chapel of the Savoy, and he has written music for award-winning films and documentaries for Channel4, BBC4, More4 and BBC Radio 3.

William comes from a strong choral background. As a boy treble he was Head Chorister at The Temple Church, and performed as a soloist with The Royal Choral Society, and as an adult he sang in the Bristol University Chamber Choir. Since graduation he has been director of a number of church choirs in south west London. This classical grounding is reflected in his choral compositions. William currently combines being Director of Music at Shrewsbury House School with his composing and academic work. He has worked with postgraduate students from The Royal Academy of Music and The Central School of Speech and Drama, workshopping his musicals.

William's research interests include looking at the effectiveness of different methods of analysis of music for screen. With the increased use of library music and commercially released tracks, the role of the screen composer has evolved, as has their relationship to the industry. Having spent a year teaching music in the foothills of the Himalayas, William experienced the meeting of Western classical harmony and traditional Eastern music first hand. He illustrates this diversity of experience and media in his composition and academic work.

Pentatone

 

Gareth Leyshon

Gareth Leyshon

Gareth was born in Watford in 1972 to Welsh parents. A late-starter in music, he worked on theory, harmony and composition privately with Michael Regan who encouraged him to continue music at university. He subsequently went to study for a BMus at the University of Wales, Bangor, where his lecturers included Peter Flinn.

After graduating, he worked for two years as a church organist and choir director, always having in his mind the idea of doing some postgraduate studies in composition. The opportunity came when he was accepted by the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris and he was persuaded by his French wife to move to France. At the Ecole Normale he studied with Michel Merlet for three years and was awarded the Diplôme Supérieur de Composition, winning the first prize as well as the Prix de la SACEM 2006.

He currently lives in Lyon with his wife, and Betsi, their rather grumpy cat. There he tries to earn a living as a teacher of music and English, and as a translator, composing when he has the time, which can be quite often. His work has been performed in Britain, France and Japan and his Prelude for Harp was the set piece at the Lyon Conservatoire end-of-year harp examinations in June 2007.

 

Benjamin Costello

Benjamin Costello

Ben is a conductor, musical director, adjudicator, singing coach and accompanist, working internationally. In addition to his freelance commitments, he is Artistic Director of Thames Concerts Ltd, Founding Director of Kingston Chamber Singers, Chorus Master for the Leith Hill Musical Festival combined choirs concerts, Guest Conductor of the Voices of Hangzhou Youth Choir, a lecturer in musical theatre at the University of Portsmouth and a musical director and singing coach at Laine Theatre Arts.

Ben has been involved as a musical director with numerous productions across the UK. He remains a guest conductor with various choirs, and as a pianist collaborates with countless singers and instrumentalists. He judges at festivals internationally as an adjudicator member of both the British and International Federation of Festivals and the Schools Music Association.

A specialist in musical theatre, Ben has worked for Arts Ed (London), Mountview Academy, the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, Guildford School of Acting, the Royal Academy of Music, the London College of Music, and the universities of London, Surrey and Kingston.

Born and based in London, Ben is a Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Musicians, a member of the Court of the Royal Society of Musicians, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and a Freeman of the City of London. His leisure interests include motorcycling, food and drink, travel and composing.

 

Mark Hartt-Palmer

Mark Hartt-Palmer

Mark Hartt-Palmer became Leader of the Chichester Symphony Orchestra in 2000 succeeding Ted Richards. He studied locally with Samuel Coates and subsequently continued under Frances Mason at the Royal College of Music where he studied violin, viola and piano. Since then he has become well-known as a soloist, recitalist, conductor, arranger and musical director.

Solo performances have included the concertos of Mendelssohn, Bruch, Sibelius, Elgar (the concerto at the 2002 Chichester Festivities attracted critical acclaim), Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante and Vaughan Williams' The Lark Ascending.

As a recitalist, Mark has played for many years as a duo with Richard Barnes, notable features of their partnership being a recital series in Portsmouth's Menuhin Room and a concert at Magdalen College Chapel, Oxford.

Mark is Musical Director of Havant Light Opera, a post he has held since 1999, and he has conducted them in several Gilbert and Sullivan operas. He has also directed the Hayling Musical Society, with whom he has conducted performances of Oklahoma!, Half a Sixpence and most recently in their production of Leslie Bricusse's Scrooge in which he arranged the score for wind quintet and two keyboards. He was Musical Director for Blake Lapthorn Solicitors' pantomime, in which he undertook the vocal arrangements and orchestration.

Several of Mark's arrangements have been performed, most notably reduced orchestrations of Iolanthe and The Gondoliers.

Currently Mark is Musical Director of Petersfield Hi-Lights, whose staging of The Music Man took place in May 2005.

 

Rex Latter

Rex Latter

Rex Latter was taught piano by a Miss Lily Hillier, well known in her time as both pianist and mandolin player, organ by Eileen Belchamber and harmony by Norman Demuth, a professor at the Royal Academy of Music.

Currently organist at Bognor Parish Church (St. Wilfrid), he has a busy life as accompanist to various choirs and musical groups including Sounds Sacred of Arundel and until recently The Bognor Regis Choir, alas now ceased. He sings tenor in Off Centre, a (mostly) a cappella chamber choir, as well as working with a number of individual singers and instrumentalists in the area. He is also an active member of the Bognor Regis Music Club.

He started composing music at the age of 13 and has produced a modest output of largely church music spasmodically throughout his working life. Now in retirement, that has increased considerably and he is now exploring the world of instrumental music.

 

Peter Flinn

Peter Flinn

Peter Flinn studied at the University of Wales, Bangor, where he now lectures in Composition, Orchestration and History of Twentieth Century Music. He studied composition with William Mathias in Bangor and later with John Joubert in Birmingham and was awarded the BMus Degree in 1989, the MMus Degree in 1991 and a Doctorate in 1995. He has composed many works for brass band, brass ensembles, choir and orchestra in addition to a growing and impressive body of chamber music.

Significant works include Paean (trumpet and piano), Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence (unaccompanied SATB choir), Fanfare for the Launch of a Ship (brass band), Three Poems for Orchestra, Lullaby and Dances (solo treble/tenor recorder), Three Miniature Portraits (clarinet choir), Down to Earth (double bass and piano) and Lamentationes (written for the Fitzwilliam String Quartet). His music has been performed extensively throughout Britain alongside important performances in the USA and Europe.

Three Contrasting Pieces (solo organ) won Tlws y Prif Gyfansoddwr at the Royal National Eisteddfod in 1994 and was subsequently performed on television and radio, and a commission funded by the Ida Carroll Trust led to a work for chamber orchestra in memory of Professor Peter Crossley Holland.

In addition to his lecturing, Peter is an examiner for the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music and plays organ, harpsichord and percussion. He has been invited to give lectures and talks throughout the world, most recently travelling to Malaysia as a visiting professor, giving lectures on Stravinsky and Orchestration.

 

Tamsin Jones

Tamsin Jones

Tamsin Jones studied music at the universities of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne and Birmingham, earning her doctorate from the latter with a thesis on Schutz's Passion settings. She has recently returned to the UK after working in southern Japan for many years, and is now pursuing a career as a freelance musician and writer.

 

Victoria Larley

Victoria Larley

Victoria Larley was born in Chichester and read music at university before pursuing a career as a teacher of singing and piano. She teaches at Kingscourt School in Hampshire, and Prebendal School - Chichester Cathedral's choir school - in West Sussex.

Victoria sings contralto and performs both locally and further afield as well as being an organist of St Wilfrid's Church, Chichester.

 

 

James Webb

James Webb

James Webb studied composition with Richard Hoadley at Charterhouse, George Benjamin at the Royal College of Music, and Robin Holloway at Cambridge University. He began a postgraduate degree at Lampeter University, before working for two years as a producer with BBC Radio 3.

In 1992 he won the first BBC Young Musician of the Year Composers Award, and has had music performed by many diverse groups including London Voices, the Delta Saxophone Quartet, and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

He has sung as a lay clerk at Llandaff Cathedral and St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral, Edinburgh. In 2012 he left his post as the Director of Music at Wimbledon High School in London to take up the equivalent post at Hull Collegiate School.

 

Christopher Larley

Christopher Larley

Christopher Larley read music at the Welsh College of Music and Drama. After a year spent as Lay Clerk of Llandaff Cathedral, combined with teaching at the Choir School, he moved to Chichester.

From 1996 to 2004 he was a Tenor Lay Vicar of Chichester Cathedral, but from January 2005 he has been Director of Music at St. Paul's Church, Chichester.

Christopher now combines percussion teaching at Prebendal School, Bishop Luffa, Lavant House and St. Margaret's, Midhurst with solo singing, composing and directing various choirs.

He conducts Chantry Quire and has recently undertaken a role conducting one of the West Sussex County Council Choirs for the new Chorus project for young voices, the Central Singers.

Recent and forthcoming solo engagements include Lloyd Webber's The Saviour in Sussex, Mozart's Requiem in London and Britten's St. Nicholas as part of the Chichester Festivities.

Christopher has written many pieces for choral and instrumental ensembles.